Mochizuki kanji

mochizuki kanji

Contents • 1 Background mochizuki kanji 2 Plot • 2.1 Toman Arc • 3 Members • 4 Battles • 5 References • 6 Site Navigation Background Mizo Middle Five was formed sometime during or before the year 2005. Their leader was Atsushi Sendo with Takemichi Hanagaki as his second-in-command. Plot Toman Arc In the original timeline the Mizo Mid Five had no respect and were "slaves" to the Tokyo Manji Gang.

mochizuki kanji

The crew was also disbanded when Takemichi left the gang in high school. The slave status of the crew changed when during his third time leap Takemichi stood up to their "master" Masataka Kiyomizu and caught the eye of Ken Ryuguji and Manjiro Sano. However the group was still not taken seriously at this time.

mochizuki kanji

During the Battle of 8/3, they fought against Kiyomasa and his soldiers in an attempt to save Draken and Takemichi, although they were severely beaten and failed to win against Kiyomasa's cronies. It is not known when the four other members of the crew joined Toman but it could've been after the battle mochizuki kanji August 3rd or Bloody Halloween as in an alternate timeline they are seen as executives of Toman alongside Takemichi.

The next battle involving the crew was when during the beginning of the Tenjiku Arc all five of the members were jumped by Tenjiku soldiers arriving in Shibuya. After that the crew was attacked by Yasuhiro Muto and other members of Toman's fifth division as Mucho wanted to torture Takemichi and convince Hajime Kokonoi to join Tenjiku.

The last battle involving the members of Mizo Mid Five was during the Tenjiku fight.

mochizuki kanji

In the current timeline all five members of mochizuki kanji crew attend the same high school while their status in the future is unknown. Members Mizo Middle Five • ↑ Tokyo Revengers Manga: Chapter 1 (p.

9). • ↑ Tokyo Revengers Manga: Chapter 26 (p. 12). Site Navigation Organizations Black Dragon · Bonten · Brahman · Dino South · Ikebukuro Criminal Black Members · Jugem · Kanto Manji Gang · Kiyomasa's Gang · Kodo Rengo · Max Maniacs · Moebius · Night Dust · Ragnarok · Rokuhara Tandai · S-62 Generation · Tenjiku · Tokyo Manji Gang · Twin Devils Gang · Valhalla For other uses, see Kunoichi (disambiguation).

Kunoichi ( Japanese: くノ一, also くのいち or クノイチ) is a Japanese cant term for "woman" ( 女, onna). [1] [2] In popular culture, it is often used for female ninja or practitioner of ninjutsu ( ninpo). The term was largely popularized by novelist Futaro Yamada in his novel Ninpō Hakkenden (忍法八犬伝) in 1964.

mochizuki kanji

{INSERTKEYS} [1] Although kunoichi have appeared in numerous creative works, including novels, TV dramas, movies, and manga, Mie University historians have concluded that there are no historical records of female ninja performing reconnaissance and subversive activities in the same manner as their male counterparts.

However, the late 17th century ninja handbook Bansenshukai describes a technique called kunoichi-no-jutsu (くノ一の術, "the ninjutsu of a woman") in which a woman is used for infiltration and information gathering, which Seiko Fujita considers evidence of female ninja activty. 女 being made up from くノ一 The term is thought to derive from the names of characters that resemble the three strokes in the Japanese kanji character for "woman" ( 女, onna) in the following stroke order: • " く" is a hiragana character pronounced " ku" • " ノ" is a katakana character pronounced " no" • " 一" is a kanji character pronounced "ichi" (and meaning " one").

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mochizuki kanji

The word "kunoichi" was not used frequently in the Edo period. This is probably because in this era, the kanji letter "女" was not written in regular script but usually in cursive script, and the cursive script of "女" cannot be decomposed into "く", "ノ", and "一".

mochizuki kanji

{INSERTKEYS} [1] History of use [ edit ] Recent research by Mie University historians Yūji Yamada, Katsuya Yoshimaru, and others indicates that there are no historical records of the existence of female ninja who conducted reconnaissance and subversive activities in the same manner as their male counterparts. [1] [2] According to Yoshimaru, kunoichi came to mean "female ninja" in the creative works largely due to the influence of Futaro Yamada's Ninpōchō series.

[1] During the Edo period, kunoichi was used as a cant term to refer to a woman and had no meaning for a female ninja. However, the term has very few examples of usage, most likely because the writing style at the time was not composed of the three strokes attributed to kunoichi.

[1] The eighth volume of the ninja handbook Bansenshukai written in 1676 describes Kunoichi-no-jutsu (くノ一の術, the ninjutsu of a woman), which can be translated as "a technique to use a female". [1] The Bansenshukai compiles the knowledge of the ninja clans in the regions of Iga and Kōka. According to this document, the main function of the kunoichi was espionage, finding functions in enemy house services, to gather knowledge, gain trust or listen to conversations.

[3] This "technique to use a female" was employed for infiltration purposes when it was difficult for a man to infiltrate. {/INSERTKEYS}

mochizuki kanji

{INSERTKEYS} [1] [3] There is a technique in which a kunoichi uses a double-bottomed wooden chest to infiltrate a person into a building by telling the wife of the house that she is retrieving a wooden chest. Both of these techniques however are described as "techniques through the usage of a woman". {/INSERTKEYS}

mochizuki kanji

{INSERTKEYS} [1] Seiko Fujita considers these techniques to be evidence of female ninja, [3] while Yoshimaru and Yamada consider female ninja not to have existed. [1] A disputed historical example is Mochizuki Chiyome, a 16th-century noble descendant who was commissioned by warlord Takeda Shingen to recruit women to create a secret network of hundreds of spies.

[3] Another early mention of kunoichi exists in the poem compilation Enshūsenkuzuke by Waki Enshū from 1680, and was used to refer to Sei Shōnagon, a female poet.

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mochizuki kanji

{INSERTKEYS} [1] Iga FC Kunoichi, a women's football club which is based in the city of Iga, takes its name from the term. See also [ edit ] • Onna-musha, female samurai • Umemura Sawano, 16th–17th century female ninja • Hatsume no Tsubone, a fictious female ninja • Mochizuki Chiyome, a Japanese woman of contested historicity who claimed to be a female ninja leader • Tsunade, a fictional female ninja from the folktale Jiraiya Gōketsu Monogatari References [ edit ] • ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Ninja no tanjō.

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mochizuki kanji

Katsuya Yoshimaru, Yūji Yamada, 吉丸雄哉, 山田雄司 (Shohan ed.). 2017. pp. 168–170, 184.

mochizuki kanji

ISBN 978-4-585-22151-7. OCLC 982054805. {{ cite book}}: CS1 maint: others ( link) • ^ a b Yamada, Yuji (2016). Ninja no Rekishi 忍者の歴史. Kadokawa Gakugei Shuppan 角川学芸出版.

mochizuki kanji

序章「忍者とは何か」. • ^ a b c d Seiko Fujita, From Ninjutsu to Spy Warfare (忍術からスパイ戦へ). Higashi Shisha, 1942. pp 83. Edit links • This page was last edited on 2 April 2022, at 01:32 (UTC). • Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License 3.0 ; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

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